News Headlines

Front gate emblazoned with Haudenosaunee images goes up

(top) Men who helped make the gate a reality take a minute to pose in front of it after a day of installing it Sunday. (Photos by Jim C. Powless); (left) Colin Sandy was the mastermind behind creating the designs out of iron.; (right) Even Cayuga Royanni Blake Bomberry lent a hand at welding a portion of the gate, along with his support Sunday. (Photos by Jim C Powless); (bottom) The newly designed gate graces the entranceway to Kanonhstaton. It’s been a few months in the making but thanks to the artistic talent of Six Nations ironworkers, an iconic front gate emblazoned with the Hiawatha belt and Two Row wampum has gone up at the front entrance of Kanonhstaton.
(top) Men who helped make the gate a reality take a minute to pose in front of it after a day of installing it Sunday. (Photos by Jim C. Powless); (left) Colin Sandy was the mastermind behind creating the designs out of iron.; (right) Even Cayuga Royanni Blake Bomberry lent a hand at welding a portion of the gate, along with his support Sunday. (Photos by Jim C Powless); (bottom) The newly designed gate graces the entranceway to Kanonhstaton. It’s been a few months in the making but thanks to the artistic talent of Six Nations ironworkers, an iconic front gate emblazoned with the Hiawatha belt and Two Row wampum has gone up at the front entrance of Kanonhstaton.

It is the piece de resistance after a summer-long effort by Six Nations people to clean up, secure and revitalize the lands at Kanonhstaton, formerly known as the Douglas Creek Estates housing development site on the outskirts of Caledonia.

Jeff “Hawk” Henhawk, a staunch supporter at Kanonhstaton who helped build the gate, said the images on the front gate are symbolic of who the Haudenosaunee people are.

“It really represents who we are, as a collective, as a community,” said Hawk. “Everything is right there under the Two Row; everything is there under the Five Nations; that’s who we are. We are a Confederacy. We live by the Confederacy; we live by the Two Row.”

It started with the construction of two gates, said Hawk.

For entire content purchase a subscription package.

Lawyer: Doctors accused of 'drive-by capacity assessment' in girl’s right to cancer treatment choice

(left) Justice Gethin Edwards; (right) Eliza Montour (Photos by Donna Duric)
(left) Justice Gethin Edwards; (right) Eliza Montour (Photos by Donna Duric)

The case of whether or not a Six Nations girl should have the right to choose her own cancer treatments should be before an expert provincial tribunal, not the courts, says Toronto lawyer Mark Handelman.

In his closing submissions at Brantford court last week, Handelman said the 11-year-old’s case should have gone to the Consent and Capacity Board as soon as she and her mother decided to cut off chemotherapy treatments in August.

“The consent and capacity board is an expert tribunal,” said Handelman. “The statute does not authorize your honour (Justice Gethin Edward) to adjudicate a treatment decision. If she is capable, the decision is hers. She at least would have been in the building where her rights were being adjudicated and attended if she wanted to.” Handelman represents the Brant Family and Child Services (formerly CAS) in court.

McMaster Children’s Hospital has taken Brant Family and Child Services to court over the agency’s refusal to apprehend a Six Nations girl who stopped chemotherapy treatments in favour of traditional treatments for her acute lymphoblastic leukemia in August.

For entire content purchase a subscription package.

Child welfare designation could begin transitioning next year

The transition to a new child welfare agency on Six Nations could come as early as next year.

Tricia Longboat, executive director of O Gwadeni:deo (Taking Care of Our Own) says they just need to tweak their policy documents for re-submission to the Ministry of Child and Family Services for approval before moving into the transition phase.

The pre-designated agency, located at Stoneridge Children’s Centre, will also have to undergo a site visit from ministry officials before moving into the transition phase.

“Aboriginal people should be delivering child and family services in their own community with their own people,” said Longboat. “Now, it’s being recognized by the Ontario government. That’s what the legislation is saying: we’re going to support your right to do this.”

The takeover of child protection services on Six Nations is years in the making.

For entire content purchase a subscription package.

 

Local News Headlines

Local News

  • Community members watching disintegrator testing ... Read more
  • Six Nations man in "medical distress" in Brantford jail dies ... Read more
  • Six Nations man is new city police chief ... Read more
  • OLG MAKES SECOND-QUARTER PAYMENT TO BRANTFORD ... Read more
  • Husking of the corn, a tradition as old as the Haudenosaunee ... Read more
  • Home Improvement Section ... Read more

For entire content purchase a subscription package.

 

News Headlines

Christy Clark enlists Shawn Atleo to improve aboriginal relations

Former national chief will lead talks with First Nations, companies, political leaders

The B.C. government will provide funding to Vancouver Island University, which will host Shawn Atleo as part of the university’s Centre for pre-Confederation Treaties and Reconciliation, according to details obtained by The Sun. Photograph by: Adrian Wyld , THE CANADIAN PRESS
Turtle Island News sales executive and artist Bill Powless and editor Lynda Powless accept a certificate of recognition from councillor Helen Miller.

Vancouver - CP- Premier Christy Clark has tapped former national aboriginal leader Shawn Atleo to lead a new round of talks between First Nations, governments and the business community during a contentious time for aboriginal relations in the province, The Vancouver Sun has learned.

Clark will make the announcement in Nanaimo on Thursday, proclaiming Atleo, a former national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, as British Columbia’s new “Shqwi qwal (Speaker) for Indigenous Dialogue.”

The new position, which B.C. is billing as the first of its kind in Canada, will see Atleo travel the province to kickstart “dialogue sessions” about priorities between First Nations, local leaders and corporations, according to details obtained by The Sun.

The move comes at a key time for aboriginal relations in B.C., as the issues of oil pipelines, liquefied natural gas plants and aboriginal land title court rulings create questions and conflict between the business community, First Nations, Victoria and Ottawa.

Read more ...

Local News

Final arguments in Six Nations girl's cancer case

A Brantford judge is now left to deliberate on a decision in a precedent-setting case of a Six Nations girl who chose to forego chemotherapy in favour of traditional and alternative medicine to fight her leukemia.

Justice Gethin Edward heard final arguments in court Wednesday where McMaster Children's Hospital made an application seeking to force the Brant Children's Aid Society to intervene in the girl's case and return her to chemotherapy.

The 11-year-old girl underwent chemotherapy for 10 days in August before stopping due to debilitating side effects and a desire to pursue alternative treatments.

The hospital informed the CAS about the matter but after investigating, the CAS decided not to intervene. That's when the hospital took the CAS to court.

McMaster oncologists have argued the girl has an 80 to 85 per cent chance of survival with chemotherapy but without it, she will die.

Read more ...

Band Council congratulates Turtle Island News and artist Bill Powless

Turtle Island News sales executive and artist Bill Powless and editor Lynda Powless accept a certificate of recognition from councillor Helen Miller
Turtle Island News sales executive and artist Bill Powless and editor Lynda Powless accept a certificate of recognition from councillor Helen Miller.

Six Nations Band Council congratulated the Turtle Island News last week after the paper won a national front pages award for our War of 1812 special commemorative edition published in 2012.

The front page of the special edition features the amazing artwork of talented local artist Bill Powless, ad sales executive at The Turtle Island News.

The Turtle Island News beat out other national newspapers, including the Globe and Mail and the Toronto Star, for the prestigious award, coming second in the Front Pages competition held by Newspapers Canada.

Coun. Helen Miller presented Bill Powless and Turtle Island News Publisher Lynda Powless with a certificate of recognition for the paper’s achievement.

Read more ...

Sports News

Sports Headlines

Six Nations Regatta

  • Softball champ recognized by band council ... Read more
  • Errol Jamieson fondly remembered at tourney ... Read more
  • Six Nations power duo score in Hawks win over Port Dover ... Read more
  • Champions start young as Six Nations Royal Reds take gold ... Read more
  • Local woman completes 60 km walk for cancer ... Read more
  • Winter lacrosse, a pathway to dreams ... Read more
  • River Cats Mikenzie Sandy earns shutout vs. Dolfasco 2 ... Read more
  • Cher looking to dominate Nationals and stamp ticket to PanAm ... Read more
  • Austin Henry making mark with Assumption ... Read more
  • Knighthawks receive Dreamcatcher Award in Sports and Recreation ... Read more

For entire content purchase a subscription package.

 

Opinion

Lynda Powless, Editor

Wynne’s Ontario blame game

Since the Confederacy began cleaning up Kanonhstaton this past summer there has been nothing but peace at the former housing development now reclaimed by Six Nations.
The lands were part of a 2006 land Reclamation movement that saw a summer of barricades as Six Nations people sought to reclaim their unceded lands that had been taken and registered under Ontario’s land registry, without the permission of Six Nations.
That incident began years ago when First Nations lands went up for grabs by a non-native government bent on expanding a country it would call Canada from sea to sea, forgetting who stood inbetween and when they did remember came up with newly created laws to stop them from legally retaining title to their lands.
In contemporary times First Nations have moved in a variety of ways to reclaim their lands and force treaties into law or recognition of their rights.
The Chiefs of Ontario in an open letter this week reminds all the newly elected municipal leaders that in fact they have issues with First Nation communities and are better off consulting and partnering with First Nations instead of facing protests. (See page 19)
At Six Nations the issue became glaringly clear during the 2006 Reclamation that continues to this day, eight years later.
This weekend a gate went up across the driveway into the site. A gate designed by two Six Nations men who relied only on their own teachings to embed designs that are endearingly treasured by Haudenosaunee and now they act as an entrance into Six Nations lands that Ontario is hard pressed to keep whining the lands are registered in their registry so they must belong to them. A registry that itself may never stand the glare of sunlight when tracing property titles lead you to a dead end where lands are simply listed as “Crown” land with no explanation on how it became “Crown” land.
Whether it’s a housing development or casino like Brantford’s Charity Casino, Ontario is turning a blind eye to their responsibility to resolve outstanding issues.
When pressed Ontario is quick to blame the federal government and say little about their own legal responsibility to the Confederacy and Confederacy lands.
It’s time for Ontario to re-sign the Confederacy communications protocol and return to talks with the Confederacy.
While Ontario’s Premier Kathleen Wynne may think her China trip, signing onto protocols to bring business and jobs to Ontario is a success China won’t be smiling if they come to Ontario only to find the land they thought they were doing business on doesn’t belong to Ontario.
Wynne needs to clean up her act at home and sign onto the only protocol that will bring prosperity to southern Ontario. The communications protocol with the Confederacy, before the China trip becomes another international embarrassment for Toronto, also land of the Haudenosaunee.

Weekly Cartoon

For entire content purchase a subscription package.

Notices


Hodenushonnees Notice


Hodenushonnees Notice

Daily Newsblast


Hodenushonnees Notice

For entire content purchase a subscription package.

Turtle Island News Publications
Aboriginal Business Aboriginal Tourism Discover Six Nations Choices Aboriginal Education Fore Golf Magazine
Aboriginal Business Winter Spring 2014 Aboriginal Tourism 2014 Discover Six Nations 2014 Choices Magazine Spring 2014 FORE Golf Magazine 2014

Advertise in Canada's only National Aboriginal Business Magazine.
One of our advertising executives would be happy to help you! sales@theturtleislandnews.com

Aboriginal Tourism Magazine
Your guide to tourism, festivals and entertainment in aboriginal country nationwide!
Advertise your festival, powwow, event and tourism related business in Aboriginal Tourism Magazine.
sales@theturtleislandnews.com

Discover Six Nations
Your guide to Six Nations Pow Wow from the Grand River Territory and the home base for Turtle Island News, Canada’s number one national native weekly newspaper.
sales@theturtleislandnews.com

Choices Education Magazine
Youth want to build a brighter future! They want to improve their lives and the lives of their families and friends. This magazine is geared to supporting our youth, and features choices along their educational path that we hope will help them make their decisions for a brighter future.
We want to feature your education success story.
sales@theturtleislandnews.com

FORE Golf Magazine
We want to feature your business or tournament story. Contact us if you would like to be in future editions, have an article you’d like to submit, or an event you want to promote.
sales@theturtleislandnews.com

Copyright © 2014 Turtle Island News